Archive for August, 2014

La Petite Malle Fine Jewelry Collection

In his Fall 2014 fashion show, Nicolas Ghesquière paid tribute to the legendary Louis Vuitton trunk with a piece of fine jewelry, “La Petite Malle”, to wear as a distinctive pendant.

With over 150 years of history, Louis Vuitton trunks are the secular emblems of the House, synonymous with travel, adventure, exploration, secrets, and treasures. For his very first women’s collection, Nicolas Ghesquière specifically designed miniature trunks to wear as a minaudière bag and as a refined 18 carat yellow gold pendant, as seen here.

This precious talisman will now dress women’s necklines in the form of three different trunks to choose from: a cubic trunk in Epi gold, an open trunk with compartments, and a rectangular trunk in sandy gold.

The exact design of the historical Louis Vuitton trunk is recreated with thorough craftsmanship: corner pieces, delicate padding, handles, saddles, “LV“ initials engraved, nails, Epi leather effect, and a gold bar in the back engraved with hallmark, gold weight and composition. Last but not least, a “lock hole” chain carries each pendant.

 La Petite Malle Fine Jewelry Collection
Petite Malle Cube Pendant
Metal:
18k yellow gold
Price: US$6350

 La Petite Malle Fine Jewelry Collection
Petite Malle Open Pendant
Metal:
18k yellow gold
Price: US$6800

 La Petite Malle Fine Jewelry Collection
Petite Malle Rectangle Pendant
Metal:
18k yellow gold
Price: US$6350

Images via Louis Vuitton


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Special Offer: Buy a Joanie Tote + Support the 2014 Walk to Answer TTP Together

Joanie Totes

I am gearing up to join the Answering TTP Community for their 2014 Walk to Answer TTP Together on Saturday, September 20, in honor of my beautiful mother, who I affectionately call “Joanie”.  As you may have learned in previous posts, last summer Joanie was diagnosed with a rare autoimmune blood disorder known as “TTP”, and passed away within four months.  You can learn more about her story {here}

Each TTP crisis is a medical emergency and early diagnosis is key.  It can strike anyone at any stage of life.  With each Joanie Totes purchase, $50.00 will be donated to Answering TTP Foundation’s mission to promote research, provide support and further education initiatives that are designed to improve the prognosis for all TTP patients.  You can purchase your Joanie Tote {here}.

The Be Fancy & Fabulous’ Joanie Tote was launched on March 25, 2014, six months after Joanie went to paradise.  The mission of Joanie Totes is to raise TTP awareness…one bag at a time.

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New Theme: Goran

We have a new free theme to announce today: Goran!

Goran

Goran: Front Page

Designed by yours truly, Goran is a functional, responsive, multi-purpose theme that’s a perfect option for your business website.

Goran: Responsive Design


Learn more about the free Goran theme at the theme showcase, or preview it by going to Appearance → Themes.

Filed under: Themes
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SO GOODNIGHT CRUEL WORLD, I’LL SEE YOU IN THE MORNING

{title and video: kanye west “power”}

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THE BEST OF STOCKHOLM FASHION WEEK S/S 15 . . . SO FAR

Cheap Monday’s concept (New Doom! which reflects “a naïve and youthful direction, the positive spirit of the innocent in the face of a gloomy environment.”)
J. Lindeburg’s makeup

Diana Orving’s dresses
BACK’s knitwear and jersey pieces
and Isabell Yalda Hellysaz’s outerwear
I haven’t been completely blown away by any of the collections so far. So, looking forward to seeing more tomorrow (the final day).
{photos: fashionweek.se}

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TIME WILL PASS, AND WE SHALL GO AWAY FOR EVER, AND WE SHALL BE FORGOTTEN, OUR FACES WILL BE FORGOTTEN, OUR VOICES, AND HOW MANY THERE WERE OF US; BUT OUR SUFFERINGS WILL PASS INTO JOY FOR THOSE WHO WILL LIVE AFTER US, HAPPINESS AND PEACE WILL BE ESTABLISHED UPON EARTH, AND THEY WILL REMEMBER KINDLY AND BLESS THOSE WHO HAVE LIVED BEFORE


{painting: diana and her nymphs by robert burns}
{image: from nationalgalleries.org}

{title: quote from three sisters by anton chekov}

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Projects Around the World

We’re inspired to see bloggers doing things they love and using this platform to make their voices heard. Here’s a look at some interesting projects around the globe.

Russell Chapman: Telling the stories of Syrian refugees

Last year, photographer and writer Russell Chapman documented the conflict in Syria and spent time in Syrian refugee camps in Lebanon and Jordan. His book, Syria: Refugees and Rebels, compiles images of his time there. Russell is currently working on a project to tell the stories of Syrian refugees rebuilding their lives in Jordan.

Image by Russell Chapman
Image by Russell Chapman

Shannon Galpin: Empowering cyclists in Afghanistan

Cyclist, women’s rights activist, and TEDx speaker Shannon Galpin — named a National Geographic Adventurer of the Year in 2013 — is the founder of Mountain2Mountain. Using the mountain bike as a vehicle for social justice in Afghanistan, she works on projects like supporting the national cycling teams, donating bikes, and training female cyclists. Her book, Mountain to Mountain: A Journey of Adventure and Activism for the Women of Afghanistan, will be released on September 16.

Image by Deni Bechard
Image by Fatima Haidary

Mark Deeble: Documenting endangered elephants in East Africa

Filmmaker Mark Deeble has been making wildlife films in East Africa with his partner, Vicky, for twenty-five years. Currently in Tsavo, Mark is focused on following and filming elephants in Kenya, and has most recently written about Satao, the beloved tusker killed by poachers earlier this year.

Nancy Linthicum and Michele Henjum: Mapping Cairo’s literary scene

Map of Cairo’s bookstores and publishing houses, via CairoBookStop.

Looking for a book in Cairo? Two scholars, Nancy Linthicum and Michele Henjum, want to make it easier for bibliophiles and booksellers to connect, and for scholars, visitors, and residents to find the literature they’re looking for. They created CairoBookStopa site with a growing list of booksellers and publishing houses, and the basics on finding books in the city (including the book stalls of Soor el-Azbakeya and the Cairo International Book Fair). Read M. Lynx Qualey’s Arabic Literature profile on the projectand take note of the Arabic version of the site, too.

Pie It Forward: Serving pies across the US

In 2003, Sarah and Chris of Pie It Forward traveled across the United States, covering 12,000 miles and giving away pies to spread a message of generosity and kindness. They bake out of different host kitchens, and collaborate with people who donate pie pans and other supplies. Now, they’re working toward establishing a donation-based food service, and securing a vehicle they can use to travel throughout Michigan.

E-nabling the Future: Creating prosthetic hand devices for people in need

In 2012, two strangers — Ivan Owen and Richard van As — created the first working prototype for a Robohand design of finger replacements. To date, more than 200 devices have been fitted on people all over the world, giving access and opportunity to those not typically able to afford prosthetic devices. The network at E-nabling the Future creates open source designs for mechanical hand-assistive devices that can be downloaded and printed for less than fifty dollars.

We hope you’re just as inspired as we are by these projects! 

Filed under: Admin Bar
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Louis Vuitton Zip Shoe Collection

For the occasion of the Fall 2014 launch of the women’s shoes collection, John Wright captured a series of graphic pictures highlighting the feature of the season: the zip.

This line of daytime and evening shoes is vamped with zips that rock each model to modernize any silhouette. Brogues, loafers and ankle boots are made from calf or waxed calf leather. Sandals and low boots are crafted with python and suede goat leather that flatter the arch of the foot.

In a skillful trompe-l’œil, a play on perspective, pairs of shoes have stomped through the emblematic public squares in Paris – Place de la Concorde, the Trocadero, the Louvre, etc. – under the aesthetic eye of Scottish photographer and film director John Wright.

Images via Louis Vuitton


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Ferguson: Ten Bloggers Speak Out

Many details about the violent death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, remain unclear. What is beyond doubt is the intensity of reactions to this story — in the media and in neighborhoods all over the US (and beyond). Here are ten personal perspectives on this event and its aftermath, from writers representing a diverse cross-section of the WordPress.com community.

 

Gukira

Writer and scholar Keguro Macharia reacts with his usual incisiveness to one of the signature chants of post-Ferguson protests :

If “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” is an expression of “humanity,” as one tweet has it, we must ask for whom that humanity is available. In fact, the insistent repetition of “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” by black bodies across the U.S. might offer a less promising narrative: it might suggest the banality with which black life forms can never gain access to the vernaculars of the human.

hands up, don’t shoot

myrivercityblues

Many commentators on the violence in Ferguson have focused on the dangers of using a militarized police force to contain civilian protests. But how militarized is law enforcement in Ferguson? In a comprehensive, illustrated piece in The NationLyle Jeremy Rubin, a political blogger and former Marine, guides the uninitiated through what he calls “the arsenal of racial oppression.”

Afroculinaria

Michael W. Twitty usually blogs about food cultures — especially those of African American communities. The events in Ferguson have prompted him to write a moving personal piece, “#Ferguson: My Thoughts on an American Flashpoint,” where he recounts his own experiences of discrimination and racial profiling.

 

Dissonant Winston Smith

A blog by an anonymous police officer currently on duty in Ferguson, Dissonant Winston Smith reports on the challenges of wearing the very uniform that has come to represent violence and discrimination to many in that community. He writes, for example, on being the object of media scrutiny:

If police try to clear the media out before using gas they’re accused of trying to suppress the media’s freedom of the press. If police let them stay, they’re gassing the media which is apparently also evidence of media suppression.

In reference to media suppression

Dan Gillmor

Writing from the other side of the police/press divide is journalist and media expert Dan Gillmor. He has recently published a piece in The Guardian about the power of citizen-journalists, in Ferguson and beyond, to expose inaccuracies (and, at times, outright lies) in official narratives by law enforcement agencies.

Two Point Ommen

One of the biggest stories coming out of Missouri is the central role of social media — especially Twitter — in keeping the world informed of the violent clashes between protesters and police. In “The Digital Mosaic Public: Twitter and Ferguson,” blogger Brett Ommen takes a more skeptical position, pointing to the limitations of social media in bringing about change on the ground.

 

tressiemc

Atlanta-based sociologist Tressie McMillan Cottom offers a more affirmative angle on grassroots media and their potential to empower members of marginalized communities:

Digital media appealed to blackfolks for the same reasons that any innovation appeals to us. It is a chance to up-end legacy structures and institutions that have shut us out.  We are early adopters not to be cool but to survive.

“What Is Left to Say?”

beccyjoy

Language and the way it can camouflage bigotry — both conscious and not — is a topic that blogger beccyjoy addresses head on:

By saying, “you do not have all of the facts” we are essentially saying “I don’t believe that you are smart enough to know what is happening right in front of your face.”

By saying, “this isn’t a race issue” we are saying “I know more than black people about what it feels like to be black.”

You might want to rethink that comment you are about to post about Ferguson, MO

Being Shadoan

How do notions of complicity and privilege play into tragedies like the one unfolding in Ferguson? In her provocatively-titled post, “I am racist, and so are you,” writer Rachel Shadoan offers a panoramic view of the history of institutional racism in the US, and tries to find ways for individuals to help dismantle its heritage.

 

ThinkBannedThoughts

The violence in Missouri caps a summer full of bad news, from the Middle East to Ukraine and beyond. Feeling deflated and powerless, writer Bree Ervin has consciously decided to disconnect from events over which she has little influence.

In a thoughtful piece, “Retreating toward Happiness,” Bree explains that her decision doesn’t mean she no longer cares, but rather that her energy is better spent within her local sphere:

I know it seems like the world is burning, and some of us are in places where we can help put those fires out, but for the rest of us, maybe the best thing we can do is stop adding fuel to the fires, maybe the best thing we can do is practice peace.

We wish you all a safe, sane weekend — and if you have another story related to Ferguson you’d like to share, please feel free to leave a comment.

Filed under: Community, Freshly Pressed
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WE SHOULD SHOW LIFE NEITHER AS IT IS, NOR AS IT SHOULD BE, BUT AS WE SEE IT IN OUR DREAMS

{title: quote from anton chekov’s the seagull}
{art: marc chagall}

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