Archive for May, 2015

New Themes: Apostrophe and Canard

Happy Theme Thursday! Today, WordPress.com welcomes two new free themes to its collection: Apostrophe and Canard.

Apostrophe

Apostrophe Demo

With a pared-down design and bold images, Apostrophe is ideally suited to magazine-style sites, like travelogues, fashion blogs, or foodie sites. It’s an update of Semicolon, built by Automattic’s own Konstantin Kovshenin.

Apostrophe: Responsive Design

Apostrophe supports Social Links Menus, Featured Images, Site Logos, Post Formats, Custom Menus, Widgets, Custom Backgrounds, and Custom Headers.

Read more about Apostrophe on the Theme Showcase, or activate it on your site from Appearance → Themes!

Canard

Canard: Homepage

Designed by Thomas Guillot, Canard is a flexible and versatile theme perfect for magazines, news sites, and blogs. It lets you highlight specific articles on the homepage and balances readability with a powerful use of photography — all in a layout that works on any device.

Canard: Responsive Design

Canard also supports the following popular features: Custom Colors, Custom Header, Custom Menu, Social Links, Site Logo, Featured Images, and Widgets.

Read more about Canard on the Theme Showcase, or activate it on your site from Appearance → Themes.

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Web Publishing for All! Introducing Community Translator Tools

Publishing tools for everyone

Roughly half of the content and traffic on the internet is in English1, yet English is the mother tongue of only about a quarter of internet users2, and less than 5% of the world’s population.3 We believe that WordPress.com should be for everyone, not just English speakers — it’s why we already serve WordPress in 131 languages — but we want to make it even more accessible.4

To keep so many languages up to date we need to make it radically easier for non-English speaking communities to help with translation. We’re proud to announce our latest step in that direction: the Community Translator.

Introducing: built-in translation

Here’s how it works: enable the tool in your blog’s settings. Then, when you activate the Community Translator, words in need of translation will be highlighted in green. You’ll be able to right-click on them, enter your new translation in the pop-up box that appears, and click “Submit”:Right-click on a word

That’s it! Behind the scenes, we pass your translation on to GlotPress, where it goes through a standard process to be approved and then deployed to WordPress.com. In just a few days, you could see your contribution become the official translation.

You can enable the Community Translator right now in your settings page, as long as you’ve chosen a non-English language for your WordPress.com interface:

Then, activate and deactivate the translator by clicking on the floating Globe icon in the bottom right corner of the screen:in-page-translator-globe

More detailed documentation is available on the support page.

We hope this new tool will make translating WordPress more rewarding and help improve the overall quality of translations. We’ll be continuing to work hard on making it easier for people to use WordPress in any language they’d like.

Happy blogging, in whatever language you speak!


  1. Language stats are surprisingly tricky. This “half” is based on wiki (55% English content in the top 10 million sites) and wiki traffic stats (47% English traffic across Wikipedia), along with approximations of Facebook’s traffic (52% English traffic based on ads data), and our own internal data (about 57% English traffic for most sites). For various reasons, all of these sources are likely to overestimate the use of English. 
  2. Internet World Stats estimates 28.6% of internet users use English as their primary language. 
  3. Ethnologue English and world stats at time of writing estimate 335,491,748 native English speakers out of  the 7,106,865,254 world population, for about 4.7% 
  4. If your language isn’t not on the list, check out “Who decides which languages are available? I want my language added.” in the Translation FAQ for some links to get you started. 

Filed under: Community, International, Language, Localization, New Features, Translation
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Street Photography: Seven Photos

It’s no secret that I love to pore through the street photography tag in the WordPress.com Reader and share images that catch my attention. Join me on another trip around the world as seen through the eyes (and lenses!) of these seven skilled photographers.

This arresting image of a bird in a car — juxtaposed against the unknowing elderly man passing by — mesmerizes me. Taken by Beirut photographer Ghaleb Cabbabé, there’s an element of the macabre about this photograph that I find intriguing. The odd bird and the filthy windscreen create a certain palpable sinister portent. Check out more of Ghaleb’s work at ALICE BACK FROM WONDERLAND.

Photo by www.alicebackfromwonderland.com

Photo by Ghaleb Cabbabé

Continuing along with ethereal — perhaps even unearthly — imagery, check out this photograph by Akshay Shaha taken at the Multiplex Theatre in Hyderabad, India. The blurred people walking near the Poltergeist poster look as if they’re ghostly spirits who’ve come to take in a movie, wouldn’t you agree?

Photo by Akshay Shaha

Photo by Akshay Shaha

Below, thasveeru‘s image of the two older gents in conversation in Malé City, Maldives, struck me. The man on the left, caught in mid-gesture, and his companion, deep in thought, leave me wondering what they were talking about.

Photo by thasveeru

Photo by thasveeru

And now, over to Paris, and Pat Callahan‘s charming photo of an elderly man clearly engrossed in his reading material. His bent posture and calm engagement against the deep red, yellow, and blue of the wall behind him is quite soothing.

Photo by Pat Callahan

Photo by Pat Callahan

From Paris we go to Brighton, UK, below for a bold image of a different kind by Peter, the photographer behind Eyeteeth. The jagged angles, the stark repeating pattern, and the intense contrast captured my attention.

Photo by Peter

Photo by Peter

From Brighton, we move to Seoul, South Korea, and this image of the bread vendor at TYR Photo. The man’s brightly lit face, his quizzical gaze, blue-striped shirt, and the colorful red and yellow sign are quite captivating.

Photo by TYR Photo

Photo by TYR Photo

Below, at our last stop on the tour, we’re going to rest — just like this tired pup — in Shanghai, China. I can’t help but find that cute canine face and the dog’s relaxed posture irresistible! This photo is one among a vibrant, colorful gallery on Thatiana Terra‘s site, NEVER CLIP MY WINGS.

Photo by Thatiana Terra

Photo by Thatiana Terra

Where in the world have you travelled courtesy of the street photography tag in the WordPress.com Reader?

Filed under: Community, Photos
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Eventbrite Now Available for All of WordPress.com

We’re excited to announce big updates to our Eventbrite integration: your events can now be displayed right on your WordPress.com site, no matter what theme you use!

Enjoy Eventbrite, regardless of theme

In 2013, we launched two Eventbrite themes to help you promote your events. Since then, we’ve gotten requests from users to extend that functionality more broadly on WordPress.com. Today, we’ve rolled out our Eventbrite integration to all users, which means you are no longer limited to only using the Eventbrite themes to promote your events. You can now connect to Eventbrite from any theme to highlight your events. (The existing Eventbrite themes will still be available.)

Click to view slideshow.

Connect to Eventbrite using Publicize

Getting started is easy — your Eventbrite connection is located alongside your other Publicize accounts in Settings → Sharing. Once you connect to Eventbrite, your events will automatically display on a page of your choice, with links to detailed views and sign-up/purchase buttons. We also added some additional features to the integration to now allow you to filter your events by organizer or venue, just like categories and tags.

Display events with an improved widget

Our Eventbrite widget has also been updated for better performance. You can use the widget to display your events in handy dual list and calendar view anywhere on your site. You can activate this widget in Appearance → Widgets.

Eventbrite themes on WordPress.org

In addition to updating the Eventbrite integration on WordPress.com for our users, we’ve also been hard at work making the Eventbrite themes and plugin available on WordPress.org! You can find the themes here and the plugins here and here.

For more details, check out our Eventbrite support page. Enjoy!

Filed under: New Features, Widgets, WordPress.com
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New Theme: Gazette

It’s Theme Thursday, and we’re happy to launch a brand new free theme.

Gazette

Gazette: Homepage

Gazette, designed by yours truly, is a clean and flexible theme perfectly suited for minimalist magazine-style sites, personal blogs, or any content-rich site. It allows you to highlight specific articles on the homepage, and to balance readability with a powerful use of photography — all in a layout that works on any device.

Gazette: Responsive Design

Gazette also supports the following popular features: Custom Colors, Custom Header, Custom Menu, Social Links, Site Logo, Featured Images, and Widgets.

Read more about Gazette on the Theme Showcase, or activate it on your site from Appearance → Themes.

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New Themes: Nucleare and Afterlight

Nucleare

Nucleare Demo

Nucleare, by Cresta Project, is a classic blog theme with a crisp, elegant design and plenty of handy features. A built-in search box, links to your favorite social networks, four widget areas, and beautifully styled post formats make this an ideal theme for your personal blog.

Check out Nucleare on the Theme Showcase, or activate it on your site from Appearance → Themes.

Afterlight

Afterlight Demo

Afterlight, designed by Takashi Irie, is a different take on his Cyanotype, featuring an option for a full-screen background image. Add your favorite background image or color to lend your personal flair.

Read more about Afterlight on the Theme Showcase, or activate it on your site from Appearance → Themes.

Filed under: Themes
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